This section is intended for patients prescribed ADCETRIS. If you are a member of the public click here. If you are a UK healthcare professional click here.

About ADCETRIS (brentuximab vedotin)1,2

Your treatment with brentuximab vedotin

Why have I been prescribed brentuximab vedotin?

Your doctor has prescribed brentuximab vedotin because they believe it can have a positive impact on your disease. Before being prescribed brentuximab vedotin you will have received other types of cancer treatments, called chemotherapy, and may have received radiotherapy or undergone a stem cell transplant. Brentuximab vedotin is used when your cancer has either not responded to or has come back after your last treatment, in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (sALCL) or cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL).

Brentuximab vedotin can also be used to lower the likelihood of your HL coming back after a stem cell transplant of your own healthy cells, if you have certain risk factors.

How does brentuximab vedotin work?

Brentuximab vedotin is a monoclonal antibody linked to an anti-cancer agent, which kills cancer cells. Antibodies are proteins normally made by your body’s immune system to help fight infections. Monoclonal antibodies are man-made versions of these immune system proteins. Each antibody is designed to recognise and attack only a specific target, such as certain cancer cells.

In brentuximab vedotin, the monoclonal antibody recognises a specific target that is found on the surface of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (sALCL) or cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) cancer cells and it delivers the anti-cancer agent to these cancer cells. Once inside the cancer cells, the anti-cancer agent stops the cancer cell from dividing which eventually kills it.

Brentuximab vedotin targets a protein called CD30 that is found on HL, sALCL & CTCL cancer cells

Brentuximab vedotin targets a protein called CD30 that is found on HL, sALCL & CTCL cancer cells

Brentuximab vedotin stops the cell from dividing

Brentuximab vedotin stops the cell from dividing

The cancer cell dies

What is the evidence for treatment with brentuximab vedotin?

Brentuximab vedotin has been given ‘conditional approval’ in Europe. This means that there is more evidence to come, especially about the long term effects. Every year the agency that reviews medicines in Europe will review any new information that is available. You will be informed if any of this new information affects your treatment with brentuximab vedotin.

In Hodgkin lymphoma:

In a study of 102 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma that had not responded to or had come back after previous treatments, including a stem cell transplant, three quarters (75%) of patients treated with brentuximab vedotin, had either a partial or complete response to treatment. A complete response was observed in one third of patients (33%). A complete response is when a patient has no signs of the cancer.

Brentuximab vedotin has also been tested against a placebo (or dummy infusion) in a study of 329 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma who had risk factors that meant they had a higher chance of their cancer returning after a transplant of their own stem cells. Following treatment there was a significantly longer time before the patient’s cancer came back versus placebo (the median time to the patient’s cancer returning was 42.9 months for patients receiving brentuximab vedotin versus 24.1 months in patients receiving placebo).

In systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma:

Brentuximab vedotin was tested in a study of 58 patients with systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma whose cancer had come back or had not responded to treatment. Following treatment with brentuximab vedotin, 86% of patients (50 out of 58 patients) had either a partial or complete response to treatment. A complete response was seen in 59% of patients (34 out of 58 patients). A complete response is when a patient has no signs of the cancer.

In cutaneous T-cell lymphoma:

Brentuximab vedotin versus physician's choice of methotrexate or bexarotene, was tested in a study of 131 patients with previously treated CTCL. The primary outcome measured in the trial was the proportion of patients achieving a response to treatment lasting (from first to last response) at least four months (Objective Response Rate 4 or ORR4). 56% of patients (36 out of 64) receiving brentuximab vedotin achieved an ORR4 compared with 13% of patients (8 out of 64) in the physician's choice group.

Following treatment with brentuximab vedotin, there was also a reduction in terms of patient-reported symptom burden and a significantly longer time before the patient's cancer came back, when compared with the physician's choice group (the median time to the patient's cancer returning was 16.7 months for patients receiving brentuximab vedotin versus 3.5 months in patients receiving physician's choice).

Information and support

Adcetris Patients Guide

ADCETRIS – Your treatment booklet

Takeda Oncology has developed this booklet providing information for patients who have been prescribed ADCETRIS.

Adcetris Management Tracker

Peripheral Neuropathy Tracker

Takeda Oncology has developed a peripheral neuropathy tracker for patients to help them record any symptoms and feelings of neuropathy.

ADCETRIS (brentuximab vedotin) is subject to additional monitoring. This will allow quick identification of new safety information.
You can help by reporting any side effects you may get. If you get any side effects whilst taking ADCETRIS, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse.
This includes any possible side effects not listed on this website or in the patient information leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via the Yellow Card Scheme at https://yellowcard.mhra.gov.uk/. By reporting side effects you can help provide more information on the safety of this medicine.